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Towns and villages
Pendle Hill and the surrounding area

 

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Barley
Barley is a small picturesque village at the foot of Pendle. It embraced three older divisions: Barley Booth (booth literally meant cowshed), to the west, and to the east and north Wheatley Booth, which includes the ancient Haw or Hay Booth and Whithalgh (now known as White Hough). On Barley's west side is the highest point of Pendle, rising abruptly at Pendle End to 1,830 ft and on the east is Stank Top.

Blacko
Blacko is on the old turnpike road to Gisburn (A682) and from its lofty position affords views towards Boulsworth Hill (south-east), Nelson to its south and Pendle Hill to its west. Blacko, which was held by Richard de Marsden in 1323 at a rent of 20s, was at that time called Blackay - the hey about it had been made in 1296.

Downham
The village of Downham occupies the foot of the northern slope of Pendle Hill situated in a vale lying east and west, and bounded along the north by a ridge of high land, along which ran a Roman road ran from Ribchester to Ilkley. In Anglo-Saxon, Down or Dun means a hill and Ham means settlement. The village had a series of names (Dunum (1292), Donum (1302) and Dounom (1311) before being named Downham.

Fence
Fence is a village named after the type of fenced enclosure that stags were kept in after hunting in Pendle Forest by Kings and noblemen, and its name dates back to the time of William the Conqueror.

Higham
Higham is situated on the edge of Pendle, and was one of the eleven vaccaries (cattle farms) of Pendle Forest. Its name originates from two Saxon words - Heg (meaning high) and ham (meaning a small place or a village). Prior to that the Roman influence can still be evidenced by the old Roman road from Ribchester, which is now a lane to the North of the village.

Newchurch in Pendle
The houses of Newchurch, previously known as Goldshaw Booth, are seemingly perched precariously on a steep hillside, near to the foot of Pendle Hill. The village is easily spotted from a distance, as many of the tall houses are whitewashed. The Newchurch name first originated in October 1544 when John Bird, Bishop of Chester, consecrated the new church of St Mary in Goldshaw Booth.

Pendleton
Although Pendleton is less well known than other villages in the area, such as Waddington and Downham, it is one of the prettiest and best kept villages of the area, and in 1968 was designated as a conservation area. Pendleton has been farmed since Saxon times and was previously called Peniltune at the time of the 1086 Domesday survey.

Rimington
Rimington was believed to have been in existence in Anglo-Saxon times and was listed in the Doomsday survey as Renistone. The signs heading towards the village from the A682 are for Rimington and Middop with the Rimington parish being spread over quite a large area and includes the small hamlets of Stopper Lane, Newby, Middop, Martin Top and Howgill.

Roughlee
Roughlee is a beautifully picturesque village full of history and intrigue, lying mainly in the valley alongside Pendle Water. In 1323 the village was known as 'Rughelegh' and then 'Rughlegh'. The place was also formerly called Roughlee Booths, as there were two vaccaries (monastic cow pastures or farms) in it, called Over Roughlee and Nether Roughlee.

Sabden
Sabden was formed in 1904 from Heyhouses, which ceased to be a township, and parts of Pendleton, Higham, Wiswell, Read, Northtown (in Padiham) and Goldshaw Booth. Sabden probably derives its name from 'Sappe Dene', the valley of the spruces.

Wiswell
Wiswell is a small picturesque village occupying both slopes of a ridge from 1,000 ft to 600 ft high which emanates from Pendle in a south-westerly direction towards Whalley from where views over Ribblesdale may be had from it. One of the finest sections of Roman road in Lancashire lies between Wiswell and Lamb Roe.

Worston
Worston occupies part of the north-western slope of Pendle Hill, and is a small, secluded hamlet along the banks of the winding Worston Brook. Worston's name changed several times down the years before eventually settling on Worston (Wrtheston, 1241; Wrthiston, 1258; Wurtheston, Wurston, 1301-2).

 

Copyright © Walks4all Limited 2022

Towns and villages
Pendle Hill and the surrounding area

 

Barley
Barley is a small picturesque village at the foot of Pendle. It embraced three older divisions: Barley Booth (booth literally meant cowshed), to the west, and to the east and north Wheatley Booth, which includes the ancient Haw or Hay Booth and Whithalgh (now known as White Hough). On Barley's west side is the highest point of Pendle, rising abruptly at Pendle End to 1,830 ft and on the east is Stank Top.

Blacko
Blacko is on the old turnpike road to Gisburn (A682) and from its lofty position affords views towards Boulsworth Hill (south-east), Nelson to its south and Pendle Hill to its west. Blacko, which was held by Richard de Marsden in 1323 at a rent of 20s, was at that time called Blackay - the hey about it had been made in 1296.

Downham
The village of Downham occupies the foot of the northern slope of Pendle Hill situated in a vale lying east and west, and bounded along the north by a ridge of high land, along which ran a Roman road ran from Ribchester to Ilkley. In Anglo-Saxon, Down or Dun means a hill and Ham means settlement. The village had a series of names (Dunum (1292), Donum (1302) and Dounom (1311) before being named Downham.

Fence
Fence is a village named after the type of fenced enclosure that stags were kept in after hunting in Pendle Forest by Kings and noblemen, and its name dates back to the time of William the Conqueror.

Higham
Higham is situated on the edge of Pendle, and was one of the eleven vaccaries (cattle farms) of Pendle Forest. Its name originates from two Saxon words - Heg (meaning high) and ham (meaning a small place or a village). Prior to that the Roman influence can still be evidenced by the old Roman road from Ribchester, which is now a lane to the North of the village.

Newchurch in Pendle
The houses of Newchurch, previously known as Goldshaw Booth, are seemingly perched precariously on a steep hillside, near to the foot of Pendle Hill. The village is easily spotted from a distance, as many of the tall houses are whitewashed. The Newchurch name first originated in October 1544 when John Bird, Bishop of Chester, consecrated the new church of St Mary in Goldshaw Booth.

Pendleton
Although Pendleton is less well known than other villages in the area, such as Waddington and Downham, it is one of the prettiest and best kept villages of the area, and in 1968 was designated as a conservation area. Pendleton has been farmed since Saxon times and was previously called Peniltune at the time of the 1086 Domesday survey.

Rimington
Rimington was believed to have been in existence in Anglo-Saxon times and was listed in the Doomsday survey as Renistone. The signs heading towards the village from the A682 are for Rimington and Middop with the Rimington parish being spread over quite a large area and includes the small hamlets of Stopper Lane, Newby, Middop, Martin Top and Howgill.

Roughlee
Roughlee is a beautifully picturesque village full of history and intrigue, lying mainly in the valley alongside Pendle Water. In 1323 the village was known as 'Rughelegh' and then 'Rughlegh'. The place was also formerly called Roughlee Booths, as there were two vaccaries (monastic cow pastures or farms) in it, called Over Roughlee and Nether Roughlee.

Sabden
Sabden was formed in 1904 from Heyhouses, which ceased to be a township, and parts of Pendleton, Higham, Wiswell, Read, Northtown (in Padiham) and Goldshaw Booth. Sabden probably derives its name from 'Sappe Dene', the valley of the spruces.

Wiswell
Wiswell is a small picturesque village occupying both slopes of a ridge from 1,000 ft to 600 ft high which emanates from Pendle in a south-westerly direction towards Whalley from where views over Ribblesdale may be had from it. One of the finest sections of Roman road in Lancashire lies between Wiswell and Lamb Roe.

Worston
Worston occupies part of the north-western slope of Pendle Hill, and is a small, secluded hamlet along the banks of the winding Worston Brook. Worston's name changed several times down the years before eventually settling on Worston (Wrtheston, 1241; Wrthiston, 1258; Wurtheston, Wurston, 1301-2).

 

Copyright © Walks4all Limited 2022