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Pendleton

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Pendleton sign

Pendleton sign

Although Pendleton is less well known than other villages in the area, such as Waddington and Downham, it is one of the prettiest and best kept villages of the area, and in 1968 was designated as a conservation area. Pendleton has been farmed since Saxon times and was previously called Peniltune at the time of the 1086 Domesday survey. Peniltune meant a farmstead by a hill, although the modern name could be said to be derived from 'tun' meaning hamlet near to Pendle. Its history though probably predates that, as a bronze age axe was discovered in 1969, which now resides in Clitheroe museum.

From King Edward holding the land as recorded by Domesday, this was passed to the de Lacys and then on to the House of Lancaster. Some of the Hoghton family were residents at nearby Pendleton Hall in the early 15th century, owning the lands until the reign of James I. The land continually changed hands with more recent owners being the Starkie and Aspinall families.

In 1847 All Saints Church, which began life as a chapel, was built by a Mrs Blegborough, who was a member of the Aspinall family, and was also responsible for building the village school in 1837, which eventually closed in 1980.

All Saints Church

All Saints Church

All Saints Church

All Saints Church

Village School

Village School

Pendleton Brook babbles its way alongside the main street through the village and past the delightful 17th and 18th century cottages, and is the haunt of dipper and yellow wagtail. Fiddle Bridge, so named because of its shape, used to span the stream through the village. This ancient span bridge was returned to Pendleton from Standen Hall after being away for almost 100 years.

Pendleton Brook

Pendleton Brook

Fiddle Bridge

Fiddle Bridge

Cottage from 1693

Cottage from 1693

Swan with Two Necks

Swan with Two Necks

In the 1940s there were two shops and a police station, but the only amenities today are the village hall (one of only 7 buildings built in the last 100 years) and a public house situated at the heart of the village named the Swan with Two Necks. It was built in 1776 and used to be an important coaching house when the main road passed through Pendleton. The name believed to have originated from when a register of swan marks was kept, and marks were scratched on their bills. The Vintner company marked their swans bills with two nicks in their beaks - hence swan with two nicks. Over the years artists choose to depict as necks - hence swan with two necks.

The Old Post Office

The Old Post Office

Village Hall

Village Hall

 

Walks near Pendleton
Pendle Hill walk from the Nick of Pendle
Pendle Hill walk from Downham

 

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