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Worston

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Worston occupies part of the north-western slope of Pendle Hill, and is a small, secluded hamlet along the banks of the winding Worston Brook. Worston's name changed several times down the years before eventually settling on Worston (Wrtheston, 1241; Wrthiston, 1258; Wurtheston, Wurston, 1301-2). Crow Hill provides the northern backdrop to the hamlet and was once the site of extensive limestone quarries and includes part of the Clitheroe knoll reefs Site of Special Scientific Interest, known for its exposures of carboniferous knoll reef limestone.

Worston sign

Worston sign

'Model' sheep on way in to Worston

'Model' sheep on way in to Worston

Worsaw Hill

Worsaw Hill

A prehistoric burial ground was found on Worsaw Hill, and when workmen were widening the road to Chatburn they found 1,000 Roman silver denarii (coins). Very little has changed in Worston over the last 100 years, although all the quarries have now closed.

Worston Old Hall dates from the early 19th century, and built into its porch are three decorative shields said to have come from Sawley Abbey. They depict a lion rampant (arms of Percy) the quarterly arms of England and France, and three pikes (arms of Lacy).

Calf's Head

Calf's Head

Worston has one pub, the Calf's Head, which was built in the late 19th century, replacing an ale farmhouse on the same site. Part of the cellar remains from the original building.

Worston like many other villages in the area associates itself with a Pendle Witch connection. The cottage opposite the Calf's Head Hotel has a small circular window known as the 'witches window'. When the fireplace was being altered in the cottage, clay effigies into which pins had been stuck were discovered, suggesting witchcraft could have been practiced here.

Pendle from Worston

Pendle from Worston

Burst Clough on Pendle Hill from Worston

Burst Clough on Pendle Hill from Worston

Behind the main street is a small meadow which is said to have been used for bull-baiting. In the centre of it is a large stone ring to which the bull would have been tethered.

One of Worston's more famous inhabitants was John Brogden (1798-1869) who was an English railway contractor, iron and coal miner and iron smelter. From an early age he was a Methodist and in later life contributed generously in time and money to Methodism.

 

Walks near Worston
Pendle Hill walk from Downham
Pendle Hill walk from the Nick of Pendle

 

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